Stories by Tamara Straus

Tamara Straus has served as senior editor of the Stanford Social Innovation Review and a news features editor at the San Francisco Chronicle. subscribe to Tamara Straus's feed

Posted on: Oct 23, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Though few people are aware that a Third Wave of Feminism exists, feminism is not dead, nor has it ever found itself in the throes of final expiration. Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future, a new book, shows that like all movements, it has only mutated and transformed.

Posted on: Oct 2, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Whither the antiglobalization movement? After last week's protests in Prague, where the news media focused almost exclusively on a few rock-throwing anarchists, the movement is again mired in police brutality scandals. Still, there are signs that activists are starting to have real effects on the IMF and World Bank.

Posted on: Oct 2, 2000, Source: WireTap

The Independent Media Institute brought together youth activists and organizers to celebrate the launch of WireTap magazine, an independent information source by and for socially conscious youth, Friday, June 30. The topic under discussion was youth rights -- in other words, youths' access to such fundamental rights as the right to speak without being censored, to get an education and to live free of discrimination and violence.

Posted on: Sep 24, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Given the first few days of demonstrations in the streets of Prague, it seems unlikely that activists will shut down the World Bank and IMF annual meeting here. But as protesters continue to arrive from all over Europe, September 26 promises to be an eventful day of direct action.

Posted on: Sep 17, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Therapists of high-tech workers are reporting there is a new addiction afoot: the thrill of going faster and faster, aided by a panoply of "time saving" technological devices.

Posted on: Aug 21, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Like many who took to the streets of Seattle, DC or LA, Naomi Klein, author of the anti-corporate bible "No Logo," thinks we're witnessing the birth of a new radicalism. But she has reservations; she's not so certain the New Left isn't just running in place.

Posted on: Aug 15, 2000, Source: AlterNet

The only D2K protests getting mass media coverage are those where cops move in and people get arrested. The press seems fairly befuddled about the demonstrators' messages -- and with their sprawling, diverse agenda, the demostrators aren't helping.

Posted on: Aug 15, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Throughout the past week, during round after round of largely peaceful demonstrations in LA, police came out in force and attempted to blind the media from what was taking place on the ground -- breakups of permitted marches, attacks and intimidation. The resulting absence of coverage has depressed but not surprised protesters.

Posted on: Aug 13, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Leaders of the U'wa, a 5,000-member tribe who live in Colombia, were denied entry visas on Monday to participate in a march outside the DNC, apparently because their threats -- to stop the oil drilling on their homeland and, barring that, to commit collective suicide -- are not good publicity for Al Gore.

Posted on: Jul 3, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Harvard University Professor Robert Putnam believes that Americans are less engaged in politics and community life than ever before. His item # 1: we have abandoned our bowling leagues and now bowl alone.

Posted on: May 2, 2000, Source: AlterNet

A coalition called Health Care Without Harm is successfully fighting one great public health irony -- that many toxic pollutants are produced by the health care industry itself.

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Adam Hochschild's "King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa," which will appear in paperback this month, achieves a basic tenet of historical writing: the retrieval of a buried past. Hochschild describes how between 1884 and 1907 Leopold, frantic to carve for himself a colonial empire, lay claim to the Congo under the most paradoxical of guises -- humanitarianism -- while actually letting loose a system of terror in which entire Congolese villages were forced to harvest rubber or face death by their Belgian overseers.

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

With 30 million Americans searching for health information online, doctors and venture capitalists have come to realize that the Internet may be the best way to get a piece of the $1 trillion healthcare-market pie. Yet as healthcare sites go public left and right, a crucial element is falling victim to profits: medical ethics. AlterNet's disturbing expose of the online healthcare industry.

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Every year over Labor Day weekend, a few thousand film buffs descend on the Colorado mountain resort of Telluride to indulge in three feverish days of movie watching. Telluride is no Cannes. Star sightings are not the central sport nor are deal-making cocktail parties for industry folks. Telluride is the film festival for people who believe that film is art -- and that Hollywood, for the most part, is making something quite different.

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Whither feminism 20-plus years after the cries for liberation and the rush to the workplace? Is it paralyzed by its own success? Or is it stumped by the negative consequences it has wrought? Today's leading feminists debated these issues, and many more, at a recent UC Berkeley gathering.

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Two years ago Indian author Arundhati Roy burst on the literary scene with a breathtaking first novel, "The God of Small Things." Now, 5 million copies and a Booker Prize later, she has reemerged as an activist, fighting a David-and-Goliath battle against environmentally destructive dams that have displaced 50 million of India's poorest people.

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

In an age of mammoth media mergers and the quest for global 'mind share,' a new breed of media organization has thankfully surfaced -- the independent, online media conglomerate. MediaChannel.org, which launched on February 3, is following the lead of its corporate competitors by creating "synergy" through partnerships with 300 media-oriented sites.

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Dave Eggers, the 29-year-old author of one of this season's hottest books, "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius," thinks people do not understand the word irony. In a complex and probing interview, Eggers explains why his latest literary endeavour defies irony, why writing shouldn't be so serious, and why -- at a time when people are fed up with tear-jerking books on incest and miserable childhoods -- his memoir is being hailed as the voice of Generation X.

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

The Public Broadcasting Service has long been attacked for failing to give voice to non-elites and caving in to corporate interests. Now, spurred on by PBS' recent anti-feminist "gender wars" documentary series, a new coalition of women, labor, environmental and media groups is finally demanding real change from public television. Will their pressure force PBS to live up to its stated goal of "providing a voice for groups that may otherwise be unheard?"

Posted on: Apr 25, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Thanks to the ever-entrepreneurial Internet generation, a humiliation-free, high-tech remedy for Valentine's Day loneliness is now available. ECrush.com, a wildly successful new Web site, is skirting the possibility of rejection and cyber-matching single people who have crushes on each other. While some Web surfers love the ability to indulge in adolescent longing without pain, others think ECrush represents new evidence of social fear and alienation.

Posted on: Mar 31, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Did you know that sweatshops on American soil have been sewing uniforms for the U.S. military? Or that the same companies that deliver energy to your home may be supporting brutal dictators in Third World countries? Or that the Pentagon has plans to put weapons in outer space, directly violating international law? If you did, you were among the few, because these stories -- and seven others like them -- were just named the Top Ten Censored Stories of 1999.

Posted on: Mar 31, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Although Nora Ephron, the creator of the recent dramatic comedy, "Hanging Up," and such multimillion-dollar hits as "Sleepless in Seattle" and "You've Got Mail," is one of the few female wheeler-dealers in Hollywood's boy's club, her portrayals of demented career girls and women on the verge of a hissy fit make one feel that modern American womanhood has become a bad joke. Ephron is proof that women can go far in the entertainment business if they produce unchallenging, pseudo-feminist schlock.

Posted on: Mar 31, 2000, Source: AlterNet

A new social movement is underway, but instead of fighting with sit-ins and rallies, this new movement arms itself with organic food. At its helm is Alice Waters, founding chef of the world-reknowned Chez Panise restaurant and patron saint of the gourment food world. In her latest coup, Waters has persuaded the Berkeley public schools to adopt an "Edible Schoolyard" curriculum, in which students grow their own food and cook their own lunches. If Waters has her way, schools across the country will be following Berkeley's lead.

Posted on: Mar 31, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Jeremy Rifkin believes one day soon you will wake up and find that your entire life has become a paid-for experience. Sound frightening? It should, Rifkin explains in his latest book, "The Age of Access."

Posted on: Mar 31, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Bridging the gap between the generations, veteran feminist writer Barbara Ehrenreich and A16 organizer Juliette Beck compare notes about the "new activism": its goals, problems and future.

Posted on: Mar 31, 2000, Source: AlterNet

Adam Smith is smiling in his grave. His conviction that markets are self-regulating proved true earlier this month when drkoop.com, the once flush healthcare Web site founded by former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, was deemed to have little chance of survival. It's an Internet riches to rags story par excellence -- with all its shoddy undertones, false promises and unsettling scandals -- and may signal the beginning of a major dot-com shakeout.

Posted on: Mar 31, 2000, Source: AlterNet

When America's original patent law was written in 1790, the idea was to give inventors financial incentives and protection. But today the patent laws are being manipulated by e-commerce giants like Amazon.com, who are claiming exclusive rights to unoriginal online business techniques. The resulting lawsuits could chok off innovation and creating a "cold war" in the industry. Meanwhile, the Patent and Trade Office is getting rich.

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