Stories by Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati edits the Institute for Policy Studies inequality weekly Too Much. His latest book, published by Seven Stories Press, is entitled "The Rich Don’t Always Win: The Forgotten Triumph over Plutocracy that Created the American Middle Class." subscribe to Sam Pizzigati's feed

Posted on: Sep 28, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

A new report by two celebrated economists attempts to reform the way we view a country's wealth.

Posted on: Sep 1, 2009, Source: AlterNet

Outrageously large rewards for executives give executives an incentive to behave outrageously -- and engage in behaviors that put the rest of us at risk.

Posted on: Aug 18, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

In 2007, the year before the Great Recession began, America's super rich partied — as never before. The evidence? We look at the year's freshly crunched income numbers.

Posted on: Jul 8, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

To become less unstable, states are going to have to first become less unequal.

Posted on: Jul 1, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

In a down economy, apologists for the awesomely affluent are having to dig deep for inspiration. In the process, they're looking dopey.

Posted on: Jun 24, 2009, Source: AlterNet

The Obama administration has watered down the rules on executive pay into mushy prescriptions that pose no real threat to the Big Boys' windfalls.

Posted on: May 18, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

In 2005, a Citigroup team began arguing that what “average” consumers do with their money really doesn’t matter any more.

Posted on: Apr 27, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

With Barack Obama's election, real reform has once again become politically viable. And America's anti-union business leaders know it.

Posted on: Apr 20, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

Families in the top 1 percent are grabbing a rising share of the nation’s income -- why does the data show no jump in their share of the wealth?

Posted on: Apr 14, 2009, Source: AlterNet

Few Americans realize just how incredibly little our nation's wealthy now pay in taxes. Our grandparents seriously taxed the rich. Why can't we?

Posted on: Apr 4, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

Hedge fund manager earnings remain, despite the global financial collapse, at absolutely stratospheric levels.

Posted on: Mar 22, 2009, Source: AlterNet

What would FDR do if he were around to see AIG's bonus bozos spit in the face of the American taxpayer?

Posted on: Mar 19, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

Have billionaires, as some observers claim, now 'suffered' their way back to the rest of us? Nope.

Posted on: Mar 10, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

Critics of Obama's tax plan claim the uber-rich will find a way to evade tax hikes. But history tells a different story.

Posted on: Feb 24, 2009, Source: Christian Science Monitor

They're paying far less of their incomes in taxes than average Americans.

Posted on: Feb 19, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

Yet again, the latest sports scandal demonstrates the perils of inequality.

Posted on: Feb 14, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

Our new White House has begun a counterattack against the grand divide between the rich and everyone else. It will be an uphill battle.

Posted on: Feb 2, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

Last week, a Labor Party "white paper" offered a surprisingly novel -- and rather remarkable -- proposal.

Posted on: Jan 16, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

Some CEOs are taking pay cuts. But here's why it's really faux sympathy for truly struggling workers.

Posted on: Jan 7, 2009, Source: Too Much: A Commentary on Excess and Inequality

In our staggeringly unequal times, the source of Rocky's distress can offer the rest of us some welcome public policy inspiration.

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