Stories by Maia Szalavitz

Maia Szalavitz is one of the nation’s leading neuroscience and addiction journalists, and a columnist at Substance.com. She blogs for Healthland.com, and has contributed to Time, The New York Times, Scientific American Mind, The Washington Post and many other publications. She has also published three books, including Help at Any Cost: How the Troubled-Teen Industry Cons Parents and Hurts Kids (Riverhead, 2006). Her last column for Substance.com was about recovery high schools for teens with drug and alcohol problems. subscribe to Maia Szalavitz's feed

Posted on: Jul 2, 2014, Source: Substance.com

The US frequently stands out in the world—and that's not always something to celebrate.

Posted on: Jun 3, 2014, Source: Substance.com

A high school student overdosed on a synthetic drug she got from fellow teens. The prosecutor is charging them with murder.

Posted on: May 20, 2014, Source: Substance.com

Advocates say that recovery schools offer a kinder, less dogmatic and more effective drug treatment for teens.

Posted on: Apr 30, 2014, Source: Substance.com

Drug panics have real and damaging consequences.

Posted on: Apr 15, 2014, Source: Substance.com

Bob Forrest gives the finger to opioid maintenance—and to the consensus of international scientific opinion.

Posted on: Mar 11, 2014, Source: Substance.com

2014 could be an unprecedented turning point.

Posted on: Jan 13, 2014, Source: The Fix

Don't believe the marijuana hype.

Posted on: Jul 24, 2013, Source: The Fix

From his first rehab in his early teens to the intervention staged by Glee co-creater Ryan Murphy in March, the star was failed in every possible way by an abstinence-only recovery culture.

Posted on: Jun 7, 2013, Source: The Fix

In a string of horrific crimes, one "tough-love" rehab is the common denominator.

Posted on: Feb 17, 2013, Source: The Fix

The media is all black or all white about brain drugs like Oxy and Adderall.

Posted on: Jul 31, 2012, Source: The Fix

With seven deaths since 2005, Scientology's Narconon flagship may finally face criminal charges. The bigger scandal is that faith-based addiction programs are embraced as primary treatment. Where does that leave AA?