Stories by Jeremy Adam Smith

Jeremy Adam Smith is Web Editor of the Greater Good Science Center and a 2013 fellow with the Institute for Justice and Journalism. He is also the author or coeditor of four books, including The Daddy Shift, Rad Dad, and The Compassionate Instinct. Before joining the GGSC, he was a 2010-11 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University. You can follow him on Twitter! subscribe to Jeremy Adam Smith's feed

Posted on: Feb 17, 2014, Source: San Francisco Public Press

Parent fundraising for elementary education in S.F. skyrocketed 800 percent in 10 years. The largesse saved some classroom programs, but widened the gap between rich and poor.

Posted on: Oct 25, 2013, Source: Greater Good

New research is finding that oxytocin doesn’t just bond us to mothers, lovers, and friends—it also seems to play a role in excluding others from that bond.

Posted on: Jun 28, 2012, Source: YES! Magazine

The dystopian tale is really about compassion, empathy, and cooperation -- and there are scientific reasons for that

Posted on: Apr 30, 2012, Source: Salon

How do our brains respond when people of color are invisible or stereotyped on TV? Here's what the latest neuroscience research tells us.

Posted on: Dec 28, 2008, Source: Greater Good

Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker discusses the lasting effect of the Bush administration's contempt for science.

Posted on: Apr 10, 2008, Source: Public Eye

To really understand the politics of the Christian Right, we need to look not only to public activity, but to private matters.

Posted on: Dec 11, 2006, Source: Public Eye

Rural Americans tend to see city culture as a haven for loose morals. Lucky for them, the Electoral College, Senate and federal budget have tilted power toward the heartland.

Posted on: Jun 15, 2006, Source: AlterNet

Feminism has given women more freedom and men the opportunity to be stay-at-home dads. But just how many Mr. Moms are out there?

Posted on: May 19, 2002, Source: Dollars and Sense

Anarcho-capitalist utopias in science fiction point to the dangers of libertarianism as an ideology.

Posted on: Apr 11, 2002, Source: AlterNet

Three new, very different books all propose the same thing: merging humanity and robotics to transcend our mental and physical limitations. It's becoming more possible every day.