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The 25 Biggest Progressive Victories in 2012

It wasn't all doom and gloom.

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12. Unions beat Proposition 32 in California. In California, labor unions helped bring out more than 40,000 volunteers and defeat of the deceptive anti-union corporate power grab, Proposition 32, by a landslide 57 percent to 43 percent. Conservative forces had tried and failed three times before to persuade California voters to support a "paycheck protection" measure that would keep unions from using their members' dues money to support candidates and ballot questions. This time, the measure's backers - including wealthy GOP activists Charles Munger and a shadowy group linked to Karl Rove and the Koch Brothers - dressed it up as campaign finance reform, but California voters weren't buying it, thanks to a massive voter turnout effort by labor unions and their allies.

13. Progressive Tax Reform Makes Progress. The same coalition that waged the successful campaign to defeat Proposition 32 also mounted a grassroots effort on behalf of Proposition 30, the progressive income and sales tax measure to fund California's schools. The outcome - a 54 percent to 46 percent victory - bucked a long trend of voters rejecting higher taxes to pay for public services. Nationwide, support is growing for the so-called "Robin Hood" tax - formally called the Financial  Transaction Tax - a small fee on large Wall Street transactions of currencies, bonds and shares, designed to discourage risky trades on Wall Street and to hold big banks accountable for the hardship they caused and the outrageous pay and bonuses they gave to top executives in the wake of the worst financial crisis since the Depression. The National Nurses Union is one of more than 65 organizations leading this campaign that would raise billions of dollars for health care, housing, jobs and education.

14. Dreamers Win Immigration Reform. By keeping up pressure on the White House, including meetings and direct action, United We Dream - a movement of immigrant youth, with support from immigrant rights and faith groups - pushed President Obama in June to announce his support for a  policy to offer DREAM Act eligible immigrant youth protection from deportation and temporary legal status. Under the program, young undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children can receive two-year deportation deferrals and work permits. After Obama made that commitment, Dream Act activists hit the streets to register and mobilize Latino and Asian voters. Already, more than 300,000 young immigrants have applied and over 53,000 have received deferrals.

15. Student Activists Gain Ground. Don't believe the cynics and naysayers who fret about student apathy. In addition to the Dreamers movement for immigration reform, America's campuses are bursting with activism on a variety of issues. United Students Against  Sweatshops coordinates campaigns on hundreds of campuses, including pushing colleges to do business with responsible, pro-union clothing producers such as the Alta Gracia  factory in the Dominican Republic, supporting efforts by campus workers to improve pay and win union recognition and pressuring universities to sever contracts with companies that mistreat workers. In late 2012, student-led campaigns to get colleges and universities to divest from the  fossil fuel industry spread to almost 200 campuses. Hampshire College and Unity College have already purged their endowments from fossil fuels. At Harvard, 72 percent of students endorsed a resolution supporting divestment. Students at many other colleges have persuaded their administrations to explore divestment.

16. Not-So-Smart ALEC. For many years, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a right-wing network of corporations and state legislators, has operated under the radar, drafting "model" laws that promote gun ownership (including "stand your ground" laws), weaken unions, limit voting rights, encourage the privatization of education (such as school vouchers and charter schools) and weaken regulations that protect consumers, workers and the environment from corporate abuse. Last year the Center for Media and Democracy, along with Color of Change, waged a remarkable campaign to bring ALEC out of the shadows, identifying the corporations and billionaires that fund it. Progressive media outlets like The Nation publicized the expose', then the mainstream media jumped on the story. Embarrassed by the publicity, many of ALEC's corporate funders - 42 so far, including Walmart, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Coca Cola, Pepsi, McDonald's, Amazon, Proctor & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, MillerCoors, Dell, General Motors and General Electric -  have withdrawn from the organization.

 
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